Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Hell's Half Acre


Yes, it's snowing.
Yes, that's early.
Yes, I'm none too thrilled.

Was trying to be kind to a California Gardener this a.m. asking about high altitude gardening. Perhaps I should have just sent him this photo.

Some days I'm not sure what I enjoy more ~ gardening? Or, complaining about my garden.

Question: What's your growing zone?
A: Zones? What zones?
We don't need no freakin' zones!
(Not indoors anyway.)

Such troubles are bound to happen when you evolve into a gardener vs. being one of those rare individuals who had a lifelong plan and followed a logical path to achieve it.

You know the type... they search high and low for perfection before making a commitment. They scan the horizon, authoritatively place hands on hips, and finally proclaim: Now this spot... Right here... this would be ideal for a garden.

As opposed to me. Who spotted a house with lots of sun and a pretty view, saw that my horses could live right down the road and happily announced: Works for me!

Q: Soil conditions?
A:
√ Slow to drain
√ Slow to warm
√ Like concrete in the summertime!
(If that's music to your ears, you're stuck with clay soil, too.)

Which leaves me to wonder... If I lived in a hospitable area where I had nothing to complain about... Whatever would I do to pass the time?

PS: I wanted to to paint you a happier picture, Steve, so, this last photo is for you. During the five, blissful months that we do have summer, it is a glorious summer, indeed.

23 comments:

OmegaMom said...

But, hey, you've got sunshine@!! Woot! You've got us beat: we haven't had any snow yet. Big City finally got some measurable snow yesterday, but none here.

Kate said...

Oh, yeah! Were it not for the plentiful sunshine this mountain gal would have moved on down the road.

Anonymous said...

Could be worse. Could be raining! - D.

JOHNSON, Cotswold Hills, England. said...

Lovely photos, Kate. The rudbeckias look wonderful when they grow in quantity - are these wild ones or planted (I think I'm right that they are a US wild flower?).

Yours was the first blog I ever visited and it never disappoints. It inspired me to start up my own. Keep up the good work!

Hopefully, we won't have snow here before the new year, even if it does look pretty.

Chris said...

I don't mind the snow. If we're lucky we'll have a normal winter which we haven't had for several years.

Marjorie said...

Brrr! We're not ready for winter!

jan said...

Well, the snow looks nice and turns into water, so in the long run, it helps the effort. If I had water, man oh man, I could grow some stuff!

Granny J said...

We had three flurries -- or maybe four -- this afternoon down in Prescott. The pavement even showed a few signs of moisture for an hour. maybe.

Rosey Pollen said...

We are basking in the glory of two feet of snow. Like your sense of humor, it is needed when you garden where you live!

Kate said...

Thanks, Johnson. That's kind of you to say. Yes, the rudbeckias grow wild around here but these aren't wild. Far too healthy to be wild ones. ;)

Conrats, again, on your blog achievement!

Kate said...

Chris;
I agree! I am excited to snowshoe. I just need a little time to adjust...

Kate said...

Hi, Marjorie - was it snowing in the valley? Yikes. I thought 'winter' had only arrived up here.

Kate said...

Jan - We may have to all take a road trip to vegas, just to warm up. :)

Kate said...

Hi, Granny! The little Javelinas needed a bath. :)

Kate said...

Hi, Rosey!
I had to giggle when I saw your comment this a.m. I was thinking about you last night when I saw the weather report....

Old Bookworm said...

Kate, I think your zone is more similar to Denver's than to mine! But we do get plenty of sunshine regardless. We just had 3' (yes feet) at our house this week and this isn't our first snow, which usually arrives around the 3rd week of September. August here is like fall at the lower elevations...we adjust and the sunshine makes it alright :) Love your pics, as usual!

Kate said...

Hi Bookworm! Good to see you. How is the new endeavor coming along? I noticed you were recommending Cross Creek, a favorite of mine. :)

Ya know, it's funny... when I started this blog I thought I was gardening at a pretty high altitude. But, I'm sort of realizing that my 7,000 feet is nothing compared to most of you Colorado gals...

Corner Gardener Sue said...

I forgot to say this on my earlier comment, so I'll leave it here. I noticed in your profile that you are in zone 5, but would rather be in zone 7. Zone 7 sounds great to me, too. I'm in SE Nebraska, zone 5b.

We had an early snow and freeze, too, but more survived than I though would. We've had mild weather the last week or so, but other obligations have prevented me from spending much time outside.

Gloria Bonde said...

Hi Kate - lovely blog. The horses are beautiful - I know you can make the bread - Gloria

Kate said...

Thanks, Gloria - So nice to find a fellow South Dakotan in the blogosphere. I realize I'm no longer an SD native but my closest friend lives in Wasta and I try to visit often enough...

Excited to try your sourdough bread recipe.

Kate said...

Hi, Sue;
Oh, I understand Nebraska weather. I'm originally from SD. Zone 7 would be marvelous. I get jealous every time I visit the Faire blog...

Anyhoo, fingers crossed we have a mild winter.

Corner Gardener Sue said...

Hi Kate,
I always hope the winter does its thing in the winter months, and when March and April get here, the mildness comes to stay. I'm not saying I'm a fan of cold weather, I just want my spring to come and stay. You probably get colder than I do, though, so I hope your winter is comparatively mild. :o)

Kate said...

True, true... we desperately need the moisture out here so I should never whine about the arrival of winter.

And, as much as I miss playing in the mud, this downtime is always good for inspiring me to do new stuff in the gardens the following summer.